Banners using modern CSS


Wide Logo

Wide Logo

Two Graphics,
One Left and One Right
Floats with Page Width

And now, for something completely different... old-style tables.

Two Graphics using <table>,
One Left and One Right
Floats with Page Width

Wide Logo

Three Logos

How to align three logos in a banner box. This page is in response to a Usenet post with a question about forcing a three image banner to a wide width. Note that for testing purposes, I did not bother to make any special-sized graphics.

The first set of images floats to the size of the browser window. The second set is forced to be 2000px wide, so the right image floats to the edge of what could be a browser window on a very wide monitor, with the center image at about 1000px.

2005/08/23: added a third banner above, with only the two small graphics and a bit of text centered between them. It also floats with the width of the browser.
2006/05/15: added a fourth banner above, using tables for layout. Note there is twice the code.
2009/02/06: added a fifth .. the same table but with the large center image instead of text.


This next paragraph is forced 2000px wide.

"It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents—except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene lies), rattling along the house-tops, and fiercely agitating the scanty flame of the lamps that struggled against the darkness. Through one of the obscurest quarters of London, and among haunts little loved by the gentlemen of the police, a man, evidently of the lowest orders, was wending his solitary way. He stopped twice or thrice at different shops and houses of a description correspondent with the appearance of the quartier in which they were situated,—and tended inquiry for some article or another which did not seem easily to be met with. All the answers he received were couched in the negative; and as he turned from each door he muttered to himself, in no very elegant phraseology, his disappointment and discontent."

..and this next paragraph uses the normal style (width of your browser window).

"It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents—except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene lies), rattling along the house-tops, and fiercely agitating the scanty flame of the lamps that struggled against the darkness. Through one of the obscurest quarters of London, and among haunts little loved by the gentlemen of the police, a man, evidently of the lowest orders, was wending his solitary way. He stopped twice or thrice at different shops and houses of a description correspondent with the appearance of the quartier in which they were situated,—and tended inquiry for some article or another which did not seem easily to be met with. All the answers he received were couched in the negative; and as he turned from each door he muttered to himself, in no very elegant phraseology, his disappointment and discontent."

..and again with a max-width set.

"It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents—except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene lies), rattling along the house-tops, and fiercely agitating the scanty flame of the lamps that struggled against the darkness. Through one of the obscurest quarters of London, and among haunts little loved by the gentlemen of the police, a man, evidently of the lowest orders, was wending his solitary way. He stopped twice or thrice at different shops and houses of a description correspondent with the appearance of the quartier in which they were situated,—and tended inquiry for some article or another which did not seem easily to be met with. All the answers he received were couched in the negative; and as he turned from each door he muttered to himself, in no very elegant phraseology, his disappointment and discontent."

--Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, Paul Clifford (1830)
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